Worried About Your Fast Food Meat? Here’s Where You Should Eat – and Where You Shouldn’t – Men’s Health

According to CNN, nine companies — Starbucks and Domino’s among them — failed to respond to the survey (for the second year running). Furthermore, 11 of the 25 companies, a fairly concerning 44 percent, were found to have taken “no (discernible) action to reduce use of antibiotics in their supply chains,” which means they got an “F.” Believe it or not, that represents an improvement over last year’s findings, which gave an “F” to 16 out of 25. In 2015, only five chains got a passing grade.

Make Your Own Damn Hot Sauce:

Want to know where to eat? Below is the full list of companies that received a passing grade. Of course, in this context (just like in school!) a D is considered passing. And if that didn’t make you swell with pride when you saw it on your report card, you’re probably not going to be properly pleased with your favorite chain earning the score, either. (If you’re looking to lose weight, here’s what you should never eat.)

  • A: Chipotle, Panera
  • B+: Subway (who “curtailed antibiotics in poultry and meat” but have yet do the same in pork and beef).
  • B: Chick-Fil-A
  • B-: Taco Bell, KFC ( KFC, it must be noted, was the most improved. The chain drew an F last year. )
  • C+: McDonald’s
  • C: Wendy’s
  • D+: Pizza Hut, Starbucks
  • D: Dunkin Donuts, Jack in the Box, Burger King, Papa John’s

Not passing? Dairy Queen, Sonic, Olive Garden, Domino’s, Applebee’s, Arby’s, Little Caesars, Chili’s, Arby’s, IHOP, Cracker Barrel, and Buffalo Wild Wings. We know! But, hey, at least you still have options!

The argument against using antibiotics stems from the reality that overuse breeds a type of super-bacteria that is resistant to human medications.

“Antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest health threats facing us today,” said CNN correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta. “We’ve taken too many drugs, and as a result, they don’t work the way they used to.” A 2014 World Health Organization report also ominously cautioned that “A post-antibiotic era — in which common infections and minor injuries can kill — far from being an apocalyptic fantasy, is instead a very real possibility for the 21st century.”

Additionally, a 2013 CDC report estimates that more than 2 million Americans already wind up with antibiotic-resistant infections every year. 23,000 of those people die as a result. And, for those who don’t suffer that fate, they still end up with infections that are more serious and expensive than they would have been otherwise.

So take heed next time you head out to lunch.

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